For the Best Results for your Steak Grilling, check your Cooking Temperature…

How done is done?

Prime graded NY strips

great quality steaks

Steak lovers all like their Steak cooked a certain way, and why not? Having a great Steak is part of enjoying the good life and our individual choices are what make us unique. To accommodate everyone’s unique taste there are many different levels of cooking that all have their advantages. So, cook it the way you like! Here is a guide to common steak temperatures.

Raw: Raw meat dishes must be done with the highest quality of meat and although it is designated as raw, most dishes that call for raw beef use citrus or some other acidic compound that actually does “cook” the meat a little. Common dishes that may contain raw beef are Steak Tartar and Carpaccio.

Blue Rare/ Very Rare / Pittsburgh (100 degrees F. core temp): When a steak is prepared “Blue” it has to be cooked very quickly. The steak’s outside is seared over high heat while the inside is still cool or barely warmed. Steaks prepared to this temperature are slightly chewy and not as juicy since there has not been much heat applied to draw out the natural juices in the steak.

Rare (120 degrees F. core temp): These Steaks are also cooked very quickly with a browned/seared external facade. The inside is dark red and only slightly warm. Rare steaks can be very juicy and for a lot of steak connoisseurs, this is the only way to go.

Medium-rare (126 degrees F. core temp): These are Steaks cooked to a red yet warm center. Many consider this to be the sweet spot for a steak. No part of the steak is cold and very little of the steaks juices have been cooked away.

Medium (135 degrees F. core temp): The center is heated and red center is surrounded by pink gradations. The outside façade is brown and fully cooked. Medium is truly a great temperature because every part of the steak is piping hot when eaten. Medium is probably the second most popular temperature for premium steaks.

Medium-well (145 degrees F. core temp): The center is slightly pink with gradations of grey that permeates the entire Steak’s interior. The outside of the steak is brown and fully cooked. Medium-well is probably the highest temperature anyone should consider cooking a high quality steak and not waste the superfluous money acquiring that premium marker. As heat is increased moisture and flavor is decreased in a medium-well cooked steak. Medium-well is still a great tasting steak but will not be as juicy as a medium or medium-rare steak.

Well Done (165 degree F. core temp): The meat is brown throughout and slightly charred. You might just consider eating a piece of shoe leather for the same pleasure platitudes.

NY Strips

Picture of great quality steaks

Holiday Party at Laurenzos Gourmet market on December 6th, 2014

@Miami #gourmet #market #seafood #meats #customcut #foodies

Laurenzos Gourmet Italian Market Miami

Laurenzos Gourmet Market 2014 Holiday Christmas party at #Laurenzos #Gourmet #market #Miami

Order your Thanksgiving Dinner today!

Ordering your Holiday meals Yes, we make your Holiday cooking easier. Ordering your Holiday meals

We have sauces for your next Sunday Dinner

bottled sauces

The Best Wines in Miami

mondavi and baron

Gourmet and Local Cheeses

smoked ricotta

How about some Jamon

serranzos hanging

Prime cuts of Custom-cut Steaks:

prime steaks

Prosciutto

proscuitto hanging

Always the best food at the BEST prices.

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Holiday Party at Laurenzos Gourmet market on December 6th, 2014

Laurenzos Gourmet Market

2014 Holiday Christmas party at #Laurenzos #Gourmet #market #Miami

Order your Thanksgiving Dinner today!

Ordering your Holiday meals

 Yes, we make your Holiday cooking easier. Ordering your Holiday meals

We have sauces for your next Sunday Dinner

bottled sauces

The Best Wines in Miami

mondavi and baron

Gourmet and Local Cheeses

smoked ricotta

How about some Jamon

serranzos hanging

Prime cuts of Custom-cut Steaks:

prime steaks

Prosciutto

proscuitto hanging

Always the best food at the BEST prices.

PARMIGIANO-REGGIANO DOP, in Miami

Parma tasting in Miasmi this week at Laurenzos Gourmet Italian Market

Laurenzos Gourmet Italian Market Miami

Where you come from matters. The relationship between Parmigiano-Reggiano and its area of origin is inescapable. It only comes from Parma, Reggio Emilia, Modena, Bologna, to the left of the Reno River, and Mantua to the right of the Po River. 4,000 farms produce milk of exceptional quality from cows fed a healthy, all-natural diet of local grass. Each wheel of Parmigiano Reggiano requires 160 gallons of this milk, which is transformed into cheese by 400 cheese makers. Matured a minimum of 12 months before testing and certification, most wheels are aged 24 months or more.

History

According to legend, Parmigiano-Reggiano was created in the course of the Middle Ages in Bibbiano, in the province. Its production soon spread to the Parma and Modena areas. Historical documents show that in the 13th and 14th centuries, Parmigiano was already very similar to that produced today, which suggests its origins can be traced to far…

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PARMIGIANO-REGGIANO DOP, in Miami

Where you come from matters. The relationship between Parmigiano-Reggiano and its area of origin is inescapable. It only comes from Parma, Reggio Emilia, Modena, Bologna, to the left of the Reno River, and Mantua to the right of the Po River. 4,000 farms produce milk of exceptional quality from cows fed a healthy, all-natural diet of local grass. Each wheel of Parmigiano Reggiano requires 160 gallons of this milk, which is transformed into cheese by 400 cheese makers. Matured a minimum of 12 months before testing and certification, most wheels are aged 24 months or more.

History

According to legend, Parmigiano-Reggiano was created in the course of the Middle Ages in Bibbiano, in the province. Its production soon spread to the Parma and Modena areas. Historical documents show that in the 13th and 14th centuries, Parmigiano was already very similar to that produced today, which suggests its origins can be traced to far earlier.

        It was praised as early as 1348 in the writings of Boccaccio; in the Decameron, he invents ‘a mountain, all of grated Parmesan cheese’, on which ‘dwell folk that do nought else but make macaroni and ravioli, and boil them in capon’s broth, and then throw them down to be scrambled for; and hard by flows a rivulet of Vernaccia, the best that ever was drunk, and never a drop of water therein.

        During the Great Fire of London of 1666, Samuel Pepys buried his “Parmazan cheese, as well as his wine and some other things” to preserve them.

       In the memoirs of Giacomo Casanova, he remarked that the name “Parmesan” was a misnomer common throughout an “ungrateful” Europe in his time (mid-18th century), as the cheese was produced in the town of Lodi, Lombardy, not Parma. Though Casanova knew his table and claimed in his memoir to have been compiling a (never completed) dictionary of cheeses, his comment has been taken to refer mistakenly to a grana cheese very similar to “Parmigiano”, the Grana Padano, which is produced in the Lodi area.

 

parm tasting

 

Our Parma tasting this past week.

parm-reggiano